Dear Elon Musk: You Need Me For the Self-Driving Tesla Cannonball Run

22 May

Tesla

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

Dear Elon:

Just over 100 years ago, Erwin “Cannonball” Baker drove a Stutz Bearcat from Los Angeles to New York City in 271 hours, ushering in the era of coast-to-coast endurance driving records that still bear his nickname. Although “Cannonballing” is often conflated with reckless driving, Baker’s feat—and his 142 records that followed—was intended to demonstrate the safety and reliability of the internal combustion technology that would transform the 20th century.

With your claim that a Tesla will make the first “full self-driving” cross-country run before the end of 2017, a new era is about to dawn, and with it a new series of records showcasing the electric and autonomous technologies that will transform the 21st.

Among all the potential benefits of self-driving cars, the moral imperative to reduce injuries and deaths caused by human driving towers above all others. Tesla already commands 40% of global press in the automotive sector; combined with the hope, fear and anticipation over the arrival of self-driving cars, the first Level 4 Cannonball Run record will be one of the most important events in the history of transportation, if not human history.

The public spectacle of a Tesla’s safe journey across the United States will likely become the hinge upon which public faith in autonomous driving will swing.

But only if the public believes it.

An edited video isn’t going to cut it. Continue reading

It’s Not Just Tesla Autopilot—Everything Is in Beta

3 Aug

Everything Is In Beta

I remember my first real girlfriend. We were eleven; promises were made. My first car? I was going to keep it forever. My parents were together, until they weren’t. I remember the girl I wanted to marry—the first girl and the third. I remember my father’s voice from the next room. Then on an answering machine, which stopped working, then on a voicemail, which I lost when I switched to T-Mobile. Then, only in my memory.

Nothing is static. The world, with all of us in it, is in a constant state of change. Everything is in beta, and anyone who says otherwise is selling you something.

Love or hate Elon Musk, his greatest societal contribution isn’t “Premium Electric Vehicles” or reusable rockets. It might just be his use of language—specifically that phrase, “in beta.” Did you think that term means “not ready,” “incomplete,” or “needs testing”? It can, and it does, but now, it also means something else: In the world of automotive technology, especially autonomy, “in beta” now means: We have to move faster.

Read the rest over at The Drive

Alex Roy Digest 5.7.16: Invention, GT86 Concept, Elon Musk, Car Art

7 May

Alex Roy

Have You Ever Seen the Rain? This Entrepreneur Reinvented the Umbrella, and I don’t know how I’m supposed to feel about this. They certainly invented something.

I really dig this Toyota GT86 Shooting Brake concept. It’s the normal person’s Ferrari FF:

Continue reading

A First Look at the Brilliant Tesla Model 3

1 Apr

Tesla Model 3

The long-awaited Tesla Model 3 was finally revealed at Tesla’s Design HQ in Hawthorne, California, and it wasn’t merely the cars that were electric. The audience hung on Elon Musk’s every word, waiting to see the car upon which the company’s future—if not survival—hinges.

His speech? Who cares? Musk could have used a flamethrower on a cage of baby lions and the crowd would have cheered. Read the rest over at The Drive

The Real Future Of Autonomous Cars

9 Sep

Alex Roy's LiveDriveRepeat - The Real Future Of Autonomous Cars

Elon Musk believes in it. So does Uber’s Travis Kalanick. The Autonomotive Singularity is inevitable. It is the enemy of enthusiast car culture as it stands, but only as we know it. If we come to understand it, it might just be the best thing ever for car enthusiasts. Might. If you truly love driving, you need to understand the Autonomotive Singularity, and that means you have to stop ignoring it and accept it. Continue reading