What Happens When Software Based Car Companies Die?

12 Dec

Software

The death of Pebble, one of the better known smartwatch brands, highlights a looming problem not just for early adopters of the latest technology, but for any adopters. What happens when a software based car company dies?

The same thing that happens when any software based company goes under.

You’re screwed. Or are you?

The degree of screwing depends on you. A Pebble watch that retails for $50-$150? Charge it and it will still tell the time. Those extra fitness features you paid for? Watch wearers lived without them for 99% of the history of watchmaking. I know lots of healthy people who’ve never heard of a Pebble, or a Fitbit, or any of the technologies supposed to “help” you get and stay fit. You know what else works? When your Pebble dies, go get a $10 Timex, a pencil and some paper.

Let’s apply this logic to software-based cars.

Every car on the road today has tons of software. Mountains. Exponentially more than the Space Shuttle and the Apollo moon missions. Most of that software is irrelevant to the basic purpose of cars. We’ve been building cars that get from A to B for 100 years, 75 of which required little to no software. Some software is useful, like the software behind Anti-Lock Brakes. Some of it is really useful, like that behind distance-sensing cruise control, but guess what? You don’t need any of it to get from A to B. Sure, it might get you from A to B more safely—and in some cases more conveniently—but none of it is essential.

Read the rest over at The Drive

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